Workshops

Instructors


Bart Jongsma: Low defense in Siebenhaar: the many uses of one parry

Level: All levels
Weapon: Saber (or any cutty onehanded weapon, really)

Christiaan Siebenhaar’s system of parries is simple in description, tricky in implementation, but very effective in practice. In this workshop I will go through the fundamentals of the system and go indepth into the details of the low parry, which is meant to protect the whole body from the chest down – and set up powerful counterattacks.

This workshop is suitable for anyone with a rudimentary understanding of the use of singlehanded weapons, but more advanced practitioners with an interest in the details of a more unconventional defensive system will definitely get something out of this.

Required equipment: I’ll be demonstrating with a saber, but any more cutty onehanded weapon will be suitable for participation. A mask and throat protector is also required. This workshop will include a lot of attacks to low targets, so it would be a good idea to bring protective gear for the legs. Any more stuff (eg jacket) is recommended but not absolutely necessary.

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Flora von Steimker: Finding the fighting spirit – from passive waiting to proactive fencing in free combat

Level: Intermediate
Weapon: Longsword

Finally in free combat – and then you don’t really dare to enter the fray? The opponent breaks in on you and you find yourself in a wait-and-see and maximally reactive role? This workshop is aimed at fencers who are new to free combat or still feel too passive in sparring and want to learn how to approach the fight proactively and determine Vor and Nach themselves.

Equipment: Mask, sparring gloves, jacket, throat protector

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Gerrit Lettke: Tournament Coaching

Level: Intermediate
Weapon: Longsword

We’ll have a close look at how to coach fencers during competitions, what to do and what to avoid while coaching.

You need be able to participate in sparring.

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Kristian Ruokenen

Parrying skills

Level: Intermediate
Weapon: Longsword

Take your parries to the next level!

Defending yourself is in the core of fencing, but much harder than just seizing initiative an attacking yourself. Some topics we will look at: placing the sword where it needs to be, rhythm & riposte, reactive parrying vs planned setups

Minimum gear requirement: Gloves, Mask, Longsword, Gorget, elbowguards. Full gear recommended.

Restricted sparring, games and similar stuff as a learning tool

Level: Intermediate
Weapon: Longsword

In this workshop we will look at how to learn different skills through some games, restricted sparring and other similar like methods.

Full sparring gear is needed

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Max van den Ekart: Ringen for those who should not do Ringen

Level: All levels
Weapon: Longsword

In this workshop, we will look at different ways to defend ourselves in Ringen by using proper positioning and stealing the other person’s sword. We will therefore be looking at somebody’s mechanics and the way you can use your movement as a way to impede the other person’s ability to go into Ringen.

For this workshop, you will need at least: a Longsword, mask, throat guard, and light gloves. If you have it you can bring you’re entire sparring gear, practicing with this shows us several aspects that we have to keep in mind.

This workshop is for all levels of fencers. We will be looking at what to do for the complete beginner but also at how and when to do certain techniques or aspects of Ringen.

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Oskar ter Mors: The Dancer, the Hangman and the Thief

Level: All levels
Weapon: Langes Messer

The title of this workshop seems to suggest you will walk away from it imbued with the wisdom of a tale older than time. Or perhaps having heard a really funny joke. This will, however, not be the case. In this workshop, we will be taking the characteristics of these three professions and using them to learn all there is to know about the technique that Hans Lecküchner calls Pnemen (snatching). Expect unorthodox approaches and deep dives, from which beginners will take away a cool set of techniques, advanced fencers a working set of principles and instructors a methodology for teaching.

For this workshop you will need a one-handed weapon with no complex hilt, a light glove and a fencing mask. Wearing more gear is optional.

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Pedro San Miguel: Savvy Sabre Skills

Level: ?
Weapon: Sabre

Special! (With a dance of the instructor)

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Petra Westveer: Should I stay or should I go?

Level: All levels
Weapon: Longsword

In this workshop we are going to explore what options you have to hit your opponent without being hit yourself, either from a bind or without a bind. And more importantly, how to tell if you are better off using one or the other at any given time. Stay for the bind or let go of the bind, that is the question.
We are going to use game-like drills. The aim is to try things out and fail often enough to learn what works for you.
That means the workshop is suitable for any level of experience.

You will need at least a safe longsword simulator (feder), a mask, throat guard and light gloves. More upper body protection will enable you to practice with more enthusiasm and chaos. Lower body will not be a target.

Some things about me: I started training and later on teaching longsword in the Liechtenauer tradition quite some time ago. My current interest is delving into the science of how people learn to move, how to connect that to the texts in the manuscripts to gain new insights, and use that to find better ways to teach people how to fence successfully in a way that approximates the historical sources.

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Ties Kool

The Obstacle is the Way

Level: All levels
Weapon: Longsword

The Obstacle is the Way is a quote from Marcus Aurelius, roman emperor and stoic philosopher.  He tells about how you should solve problems in front of you, not to avoid them.

Becoming a better fencer works the same. In training you need to face you problems, solve them and get better.

In this sparring workshop I will teach you about Purposeful Practice, a growth mindset and about stoic philosophy to give you the tools you need to reach the next level as a fencer

Stabby McStabface

Level: Beginner
Weapon: Dagger

Can you win tournaments with dagger? No… Can you get into hemarating with dagger? Also no…

Is a dagger workshop fun? Absolutely yes!!

If you’re smart you can absolutely apply loads of you dagger skills into your fencing! Balance, quick grabs, hooks, throws and levers in dagger techniques all translate easily into grappling techniques in fencing.

In this workshop we will go through a number of interesting dagger techniques and counters to broaden your horizon and skills as a Historical fencer.

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Yannick De Smet: The riddle of steel: where did all those “winden” go

Level: All levels
Weapon: Longsword

Looking at the first line of the glossa in the 3227a manuscript we get the idea that this tradition heavily emphasizes something called winding (or “winden”). Despite being used sparingly throughout the glossa in this and other (pseudo Von Danzig, Lew, Ringeck) manuscripts, the main treatment of this term is reserved for the verry end of said texts. Even there we only get a short explanation of eight windings, and an indication that each of these can be done in three different ways. This culminates in the line:

“Thus, four-and-twenty techniques come from the Eight Windings, and how you shall drive the four-and-twenty techniques from the Eight Windings, you shall find all that described before in the glosses.”

However, since they are not mentioned explicitly in the glosses before, where can we find them?

This workshop will focus on using other pieces of advice spread throughout the Liechtenauer tradition to arrive at a set of windings which seem to have some success in a sparring context.

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